Making Parenting Easier
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8 Babyproofing Myths and Misconceptions

Welcoming a new baby into your home is an exciting time, but it also comes with a lot of responsibility. This is especially true when it comes to making your home is safe for your little one.

Babyproofing and thinking about Home Safety is an essential step in preparing your living space. However, there are a few myths and misconceptions out there about what truly keeps babies safe. Let’s debunk some of these together!

8 babyproofing myths to help you make informed decisions and create a safer environment for your child:

Myth 1: Babies won't reach hazards until they start crawling

Babies can start exploring and grabbing things much earlier than you might expect. Even before they can crawl, infants are developing their motor skills and curiosity, which can lead them to grab anything within arm’s reach. By starting babyproofing early, you create a safer environment for your baby to explore as they grow and develop in their first year.

Myth 2: Baby gates are only necessary at the top of stairs

Baby gates should be used not only at the top of stairs but also at the bottom and in doorways to restrict access to dangerous areas. Placing gates at the top and bottom of stairs prevents falls while climbing, while using them in doorways can restrict access to hazardous spaces like kitchens and bathrooms.

We recommend Screw Fit Gates at the top of stair as they do not have a trip bar. Unlike Pressure Fit Gates that need a bar across the bottom to keep them secure which creates a trip hazard which can become dangerous at the top of stairs.

  • Fred Screw Fit Stairgate

    £129.99
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  • Fred Screw Fit Stairgate

    £129.99
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Myth 3: Putting cushions or pillows around furniture corners prevents injuries

Soft materials like cushions or blankets can easily slip off or become dislodged, leaving the corners open and potentially causing a new hazard. Babies are curious and can pull at loose items so instead of using makeshift solutions like blankets, opt for purpose-built corner guards specifically designed to cover and protect furniture edges. 

  • Fred Adhesive Corner Protector

    £7.99
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  • Fred Adhesive Corner Protector

    £7.99
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Myth 4: Locking up cabinets is unnecessary if you keep dangerous items out of reach

Thinking only cabinets with chemicals and sharp objects pose risks misses other potential dangers. All cupboards can be treasure troves, from heavy cookware to delicate dishes babies might surprise you with what they find interesting. By securing all cabinets, you’re not just protecting against chemicals and sharp edges, but also preventing accidents with heavy or breakable items.

  • Fred Adhesive Double Door Block

    £6.99
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  • Fred Adhesive Double Door Block

    £6.99
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Myth 5: Open doors pose no risk to babies

Leaving doors ajar may seem harmless, but it can lead to accidents, especially with curious and mobile babies. In fact, around 30,000 children trap their fingers in doors each year and more than 1,500 of them need surgery*

This is because small children can inadvertently close doors on their fingers or get them caught in the hinges.  Additionally, leaving doors open can create access to unsafe areas. Always ensure doors are securely closed or use door stoppers to prevent them from slamming shut unexpectedly.

  • Fred Door Slam Stopper

    £6.99
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  • Fred Door Slam Stopper

    £6.99
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Myth 6: Plants are harmless decor

Plants in a baby’s room may seem harmless, but many common houseplants contain toxins. Species like peace lilies and philodendrons contain oxalates, causing mouth and throat irritation if ingested. English ivy and ficus, popular yet hazardous, can cause vomiting and respiratory issues.

To lower the risk, research and identify toxic plants, opting for safe varieties like spider plants or Boston ferns. Placement matters too! – keep plants out of reach on high shelves or in hanging baskets.

Myth 7: Heavy furniture won't tip over easily

Babies can pull themselves up on furniture, causing it to tip over – and it takes less weight than you think!

To prevent accidents, anchor heavy furniture securely to the wall using safety straps or brackets. This precautionary measure makes sure the furniture is secure and minimises the risk of tipping incidents.

  • Fred Furniture Anti-Tip Kit

    £9.99
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  • Fred Furniture Anti-Tip Kit

    £9.99
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Myth 8: Once you've babyproofed, you can relax about safety

Under-5s are particularly at risk of being injured in home accidents*, so babyproofing needs to be an ongoing process. Regularly reassess your home for new hazards as your baby grows and becomes more mobile.

Babies quickly grow and acquire new skills and over time new hazards may emerge. From unlocked cabinets to reachable electrical outlets, regularly reevaluating and updating babyproofing strategies is a great way of improving safety measures as babies become more mobile and inquisitive.

Taking the time to address these myths about babyproofing could improve the safety of your home for your little one. But remember, every baby is different, so keep watching and adapt your babyproofing efforts accordingly.

 

*www.rospa.com/policy/home-safety/advice/general/cost-of-home-accidents