If your child is struggling with potty training, then you are not alone. Potty training can be a slow and sometimes stressful process and lots of children suffer from some form of potty-training anxiety at different stages of the potty-training process. The good news is that there are lots of ways to avoid potty training anxiety or to deal with it if your child is already suffering. 

Changing routines

It is a well-known fact that babies, toddlers and children respond well to routine. However, it is equally well known that any changes in their normal routine can have disastrous consequences. Potty training is a fundamental change in routine because all of a sudden you are telling your little one that they need to do their wees and poos on the potty instead of in their nappy. Whilst some children will take to this like a duck to water, others will freak out at the very notion of sitting on this strange looking chair to go to the toilet.

The key to preventing this is all in the preparation. Instead of one day deciding to take away their nappy and introduce the potty, you need to start planting the seed weeks in advance. Reading children’s books about potty training with your little one or watching cartoons about it before you start are helpful ways to gently introduce the idea of potty training. This will help lay the groundwork so that when you come to start potty training in earnest, your little one will be prepped as to what to expect and what they need to do.

When you do start, make sure that everyone in their life is on board with the potty-training journey. The last thing you need is an older sibling telling your toddler that pooing on the potty is ‘disgusting’ or a grandparent trying to put a nappy on them when they’ve already started using ‘big’ pants. Take some time to tell the people that are closest to them about what you are doing and what is expected of them during this time. It is also important to tell nursery or childminders that you are planning to potty train so they can present a united front.